Free Online Valuation Offer

Free Online Valuation Offer

Valuator:  Our computer-assisted valuation is now only provided free of charge to property owners in the Southern Suburbs, Constantiaberg and False Bay areas of Cape Town.

The valuation will be sent to you by email.

Valuator is a service marketed by Homeimage (in association with Chas Everitt Cape Town South).  HomeImage provides real estate marketing services such as floor plans, professional property photography.

Your local Chas Everitt agent will be able to review the valuation at your request without any obligation or cost to you.  If you subsequently wish to have a local agent provide you with a more detailed valuation assessment after a viewing of your property, please let them know directly.

Proceed to free property valuation 

REGISTERING SOLAR POWER INSTALLATIONS

REGISTERING SOLAR POWER INSTALLATIONS

CAPE TOWN DUE DATE FOR REGISTERING SOLAR POWER INSTALLATIONS

Owners of properties with solar power systems, and which properties are situated in the jurisdiction of the City of Cape Town Municipality, must register their installation with the City by 31 May. The initial deadline was set for the end of February 2019, but the City extended the grace period to Thursday this week.

In this Youtube video, the City explains why such regulation is necessary and also which exceptions apply, such as in the case of solar powered water geysers.

According to the City’s website, applicants can either register a grid-tied system or an off-grid SSEG.

For a complete guide to registering your systems, visit: Grid-tied systems application process or Off-grid systems application process

Curated content for Chas Everitt

The Winter Garden in Cape Town

The Winter Garden in Cape Town

There’s always work to be done in the garden to keep green fingers busy – even in winter. Our June gardening guide is packed with tips, from keeping your garden healthy to which vegetables to grow in winter.

Spotlight on: Indoor projects for kids
Keep your children busy these winter holidays with fun indoor-garden projects:

  • We love this eggshell succulent garden, and so will your kids. They’re easy to make and an effective way to teach the basics of gardening.
  • Dress up ordinary flowerpots with these creative gumboot gardens. They are also the best way to upcycle your old boots!
  • Transform an ordinary herb pot into a work of art with just two creative tools: blackboard paint and chalk. Simply paint the rim or base of your terracotta pots (whichever style you prefer) with blackboard paint, then label with the herb name in chalk when it’s dry.

ON YOUR TO-DO LIST FOR JUNE  

Plant and sow

Feed

  • Feed lemon trees with a 2:3:2 general fertiliser.
  • Remedy yellowing leaves with a micro-element mixture such as Trelmix.
  • Feed bulbs with bulb food once every two weeks and water well.
  • Winter- and spring-flowering seedlings require an organic fertiliser such as Nitrosol or Atlantic All-purpose fertiliser every two weeks with a weekly watering.
  • Check the edges of sweet peas. If they’re brown and papery, feed with a 3:1:5 fertiliser.
  • Feed indoor plants with Nitrosol weekly.

   Prune & Trim

 Pests

  • Keep an eye out for leaf miner on cinerarias and spray with Bioneem.
  • Use Bioneem on conifers to ward off aphids, or dissolve insecticide granules in water to pour at the base of the tree.
  • Use organic snail bait for snails on cliviasdaffodils and young seedlings.

    Thanks to Stodels for this article

Local Real Estate MD Predicts Increases in Sales Activity after Elections

Local Real Estate MD Predicts Increases in Sales Activity after Elections

Sally Gracie, an experienced local agent and MD of Chas Everitt Cape Town South with offices in Fish Hoek, Tokai and Bergvliet says there are plenty of buyers waiting to take action after the election.

“It is not just an observation based on gut feel, it is the clear imbalance between those viewing properties on the portals and the offers being taken. As an agency that monitors many key indicators, we see an issue here showing considerable interest by buyers but a reluctance to follow through with offers. This usually indicates a confidence issue and it’s clear that at the moment we can attribute this to the imminent elections”, says Sally Gracie.

Sally Gracie, Managing Director of Devler Estates trading as Chas Everitt Cape Town South

“We measure four major indicators; the number of people viewing our listings online, the number of appointments that result from this interest and then the number of offers taken and sales concluded,” said Sally.  “When the number of people viewing property increases, but the number of offers taken decreases, then it is clear there is a confidence issue we need to identify. Based on our recent discussions with buyers it is clear that it is not Eskom but the election that is impacting on buyers taking action. “

Sally cautioned sellers to not misread the market. “This situation does not mean that we are expecting an increase in prices as we have had a build-up of stock, in particular at the top end of the market where supply has increased substantially since the start of the year. Sellers need to remain competitive! What is needed is turnover, and we expect that movement will pick up, absorbing the increase in stock that we are currently servicing. I think we can say this is good news for everyone,” she said.

Website: www.cei.co.za

For a free market evaluation email Sally Gracie

 

Noseweek article on baboons asks many questions

Noseweek article on baboons asks many questions

Klein Constantia and the two exhumed baboons

A primate murder mystery puts one of South Africa’s best-known wine estates on the spot. 

Klein Constantia on the slopes of the Constantiaberg in Cape Town, is one of South Africa’s most famously “green” wine estates. A WWF Conservation Champion, it touts its environmentalism widely. A 2015 book titled The Wine Kingdom – Celebrating Conservation in the Cape Winelands claims that it has “extensive soil erosion plans” and aims to build a cellar “that will be powered by solar energy”. It mentions that Klein Constantia “has also experienced serious damage to their crops caused by baboons, but today most of this problem is taken care of by using baboon monitors during harvest”.

READ MORE

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

IN AND AROUND THE CAPE PENINSULA THE CITY’S MOST EXPENSIVE MARKETS CONTINUED TO SHOW THE CLEAREST SIGNS OF SLOWING PRICE GROWTH IN THE 1ST QUARTER.  Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its price growth slow the fastest off the highest base, while in certain more affordable sub-regions of the City there has still been some growth acceleration.

In the 1st quarter of 2018, we saw further slowing in house price growth in the City Bowl and the other major 3 sub-regions closest to the City Bowl, i.e. in and around the Cape Peninsula.

These sub-regions near to the city and the mountain have shown some of the strongest house price inflation of all of the Cape Town sub-regions over the past 5 years, and this prior deterioration in home affordability appears to have led to slowing demand, and thus price growth, in recent quarters.

The most expensive sub-region in the City of Cape Town Metro, i.e. the Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its average house price growth slow the most sharply off the highest base, from a revised multi-year high of 27.5% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2016 to 2.3% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

This does not surprise us, as this sub-region has experienced the most rapid cumulative growth of all the sub-regions over the past 5 years, to the tune of 111%.

The City Bowl started its price growth slowdown a little earlier than the Atlantic Seaboard, and has gone from its revised multi-year year-on-year growth high of 23.6% in the 2nd quarter of 2016 to 10.0% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

The Southern Suburbs, the other one of the “most expensive 3” sub-regions, saw further slowdown from 10.1% in the prior quarter to 8.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, having gradually slowed from a multi-year high of 16.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2015.

Arguably reflective of the heightened search for relative affordability in or near to Cape Town’s prime place of employment, the City Bowl, is the indication that the most affordable sub-region within close proximity to the City Bowl, i.e. the Near Eastern Suburbs sub-region (including amongst others Salt River, Woodstock and Pinelands), shows the fastest house price growth of these “Major 4” sub-regions in or near to the Cape Peninsula.

Proximity to the City Bowl (and for that matter to Claremont Business Node) is becoming increasingly important as the city’s traffic congestion deteriorates. From a 19.4% high in the 1st quarter of 2016, the Near Eastern Suburbs House Price Index has also seen year-on-year growth slowing, but less significantly than the others, to reach 13.4% by the 1st quarter of 2018. It now has the fastest price growth rate of the Major 4 sub-regions surrounding Table Mountain.

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THE TREND OF SLOWING GROWTH IS LESS PRONOUNCED IN THE MORE AFFORDABLE SUBURBAN MARKETS, AND SOME SUB-REGIONS EVEN SHOW STRENGTHENING PRICE GROWTH.

Further away from Table Mountain, in Cape Town’s more affordable suburban areas, the pattern of “slowdown” in price growth remains less clear, and there has even been some acceleration in certain sub-regions. We remain of the belief that the extremely high prices in the areas close to the City Bowl may have been encouraging a portion of aspirant buyers to shift their home search to these more “affordable” City of Cape Town housing markets a little further away, in search of greater affordability.

All 3 major Northern Suburbs sub-saw double-digit average house price growth rates in the 1st quarter of 2018, with 1 out of the 3 showing a growth acceleration.

The Western Seaboard Sub-Region (including Blouberg, Milnerton and Melkbosstrand) saw a slowing in year-on-year price growth, from 14.7% in the previous quarter to 14.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, the 2nd successive quarter of slowing growth.

The “Bellville-Parow and Surroundings” sub-region also saw its price growth slow, from 11.4% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.8% in the 1st quarter of 2018, after prior quarters of strengthening.

However, the Durbanville – Kraaifontein – Brackenfell sub-region continued to accelerate mildly, from 9.8% growth in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.1% in the 1st quarter of 2018.

Moving into even more affordable regions, ones which incorporate many of the city’s Apartheid Era former so-called “Coloured” and “Black” Areas, we have recently seen price growth accelerations.

This, too, we believe could reflect a mounting search for relative affordability after rapid price inflation in the higher priced “suburban” areas in recent years.

Therefore, we have seen the Cape Flats House Price Index experience a further growth acceleration, from 11.4% year-on-year in the previous quarter to 11.6% in the 1st quarter of 2018. The Elsies River-Blue Downs-Macassar Region has also seen house price growth accelerate further to reach 25% year-on-year, from 23.7% in the previous quarter.

CONCLUSION

In short, in the 1st quarter of 2018, the City of Cape Town has seen further mild slowing in average house price growth for the 7th consecutive quarter, although the most recent 10.0% year-on-year growth rate remains strong.

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Source:  John Loos FNB Property Barometer

This has been distributed by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations
South Africa’s new plug and socket standard, SANS 164-2 or ZA Plug, has become mandatory for new installations, the SABS confirmed to MyBroadband.

This means that any new buildings erected must incorporate electrical sockets that conform to the new standard.

An amendment to the wiring code introduced in 2016 stated that the ZA Plug would become semi-mandatory for new installations in March 2018.

Each new plug point must have at least one socket that can accommodate a ZA Plug, it said.

The amendment came into effect two months early, said the SABS, and from January 2018 all new installations must incorporate the ZA Plug.

The ZA Plug has the same hexagonal profile as the Europlug seen on cell phone chargers but includes an earth pin. It is substantially more compact than South Africa’s three-prong plug standard and has much thinner pins.

Adoption of the standard has been slow, however.

Gianfranco Campetti, the chairman of the working group that looks after the standard, said the industry has been slow to respond and use the standard in essential products.

He said the appliance industry, in particular, has been slow to provide goods with the new plug.

The switch

When the IEC first began development on IEC–906–1, which became IEC60906–1, it was trying to establish a universal plug and socket system.

Despite its efforts, commercial and political interests caused the standardisation initiative to fail in Europe – and Brazil and South Africa are the only countries to have adopted the 250V standard.

However, Brazil deviated from the standard by delivering either 127V or 220V mains using the same socket.

Japan and the US have plugs and sockets that are compatible with the IEC’s envisioned global standard for 125V sockets.

Talk of adopting the new standard began in South Africa in 1993, and a version of SANS 164–2 that dates back to 2006 is available online.

According to the SABS, the ZA Plug appeared in South Africa’s wiring code (SANS 10142–1) during 2012.

Old standard still legal

Although it is now required to integrate sockets which comply with the ZA Plug standard in new buildings, the old standard remains legal.

The wiring code amendment also does not affect existing buildings, including homes.

It is therefore not currently necessary for South Africans to switch the electrical sockets in their homes.

Article source

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Bramble is an online platform aimed at connecting students wanting to sell or buy textbooks, as well as physical and electronic notes. This not only allows students to earn an extra income, but it also makes the learning process a whole lot easier.

As students ourselves, we understand the real life of a student and we hope to give you more room for the good life, more time for studying and, most importantly, more money at the end of the month.

The Bramble platform has one major beneficiary,

– the students.

We hope that the creation of a platform that allows students to set their own prices will allow shopping for textbooks to be more affordable and less stressful.


This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt International